Dragons

Dragons are a real part of Fantasy and can be found in so many books and tales.  I thought I would dedicate a page to them!

The word dragon entered the English language in the early 13th century from Old French dragon, which in turn comes from Latin draconem (nominative draco) meaning “huge serpent, dragon”, from the Greek word δράκων,drakon (genitive drakontos, δράκοντος) “serpent, giant seafish”. The Greek and Latin term referred to any great serpent, not necessarily mythological, and this usage was also current in English up to the 18th century.

The Dragon in Idi & The Oracle’s Quest is a shape-shifting Dragon who changes herself into a woman and sings to hypnotize people to come to her, so that she may kill them and eat their hearts.  She is known as the Shee-Dragon.

Dragon 2

Check out my friend Steve’s new Dragon book – it’s fab!

Dragon’s Echo Books

dragon-final-cover

Popular Dragons Books – Click on the link to read about the books

Eragon (The Inheritance Cycle, #1)
by Christopher Paolini

Seraphina (Seraphina, #1)
by Rachel Hartman (

Brisingr (The Inheritance Cycle, #3)
by Christopher Paolini

Inheritance (The Inheritance Cycle, #4)
by Christopher Paolini

His Majesty’s Dragon (Temeraire, #1)
by Naomi Novik (

Firelight (Firelight, #1)
by Sophie Jordan (

The Hobbit (Paperback)
by J.R.R. Tolkien

Eon: Dragoneye Reborn (Eon, #1)
by Alison Goodman (

Dragon Actually (Dragon Kin, #1)
by G.A. Aiken

Dragonsong (Harper Hall, #1)
by Anne McCaffrey

A Storm of Swords (A Song of Ice and Fire, #3)
by George R.R. Martin

A Dance with Dragons (A Song of Ice and Fire, #5)
by George R.R. Martin
Dragon Rider (Dragon Rider, #1)
by Cornelia Funke

Vanish (Firelight, #2)
by Sophie Jordan

Dragonquest (Pern, #2)
by Anne McCaffrey

Dragonsinger (Harper Hall, #2)
by Anne McCaffrey

Eona: The Last Dragoneye (Eon, #2)
by Alison Goodman

 

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